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There are 27 glossary search results for:   RESP




Definition:
An early sexual maturation stage, occurring 1 or 2 years before the onset of puberty, during which the zona reticularis of the adrenal cortex releases increased levels of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and androstenedione. These adrenal androgens are ultimately responsible for the appearance of pubic and axillary hair, increased oil production by facial skin, acne, and distinct adult body odor.

Related glossary terms/phrases:
Menarche
Pubarche
Thelarche



Definition:
An agonist is a molecule that binds to a receptor and activates a physiological response similar to that induced by the naturally occurring physiological ligand of the receptor. Therefore, agonist binding to a receptor mimics the action of the natural ligand.

For example, acetylcholine (ACh) is the naturally occurring physiological ligand that activates nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Nicotine is an agonist of nicotinic ACh receptors (nAChR), and muscarine is an agonist of muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChR).

Related glossary terms/phrases:
Antagonist



Definition:
An antagonist is a molecule that binds to a receptor, however, it does not activate the physiological response induced by the naturally occurring physiological ligand of the receptor. Moreover, once bound to the receptor, an antagonist prevents the physiological ligand from activating the receptor. Therefore, antagonist binding to a receptor prevents or blocks the action of the natural ligand.

For example, acetylcholine (ACh) is the naturally occurring physiological ligand that activates nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Tubocurarine and succinylcholine are antagonists of the nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR), and atropine is an antagonist of the muscarinic ACh receptor (mAChR).

Related glossary terms/phrases:
Agonist



Definition:
A deficit in expressing or understanding language.

Disorders of language resulting from damage to areas of the brain responsible for language formation and comprehension.



Definition:
Another name for the parafollicular cell type within the thyroid gland. C cells are situated outside of the thyroid follicles and are interspersed between the follicles. C cells are responsible for producing the hormone calcitonin.

See:
Parafollicular cell



Definition:
Refers to a conformational change of a channel protein by which the channel goes from the open state to the inactive state. The inactive state refers to a conformational state in which ions are not allowed to permeate the channel pore. Thus, with respect to ion permeability, the inactive state is similar to the close state of the channel. Ions cannot permeate the channel pore either in the closed or inactive state. However, the channel assumes very distinct and different conformations in the inactive state and closed state.

See also:
Neuronal Action Potential - Important Features of the Neuronal Action Potential



Definition:
Refers to neurons, synapses, or receptors where acetylcholine is used as the neurotransmitter.

For example, cholinergic neurons release acetylcholine as their neurotransmitter.

In cholinergic synapses, acetylcholine is released from the presynaptic neuron, and it acts on acetylcholine receptors in the plasma membrane of the postsynaptic cell.

Cholinergic receptors are those that respond to acetylcholine as the physiological ligand. The two major types are nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors (may also be referred to as nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors).

Cholinergic drugs are compounds that mimic the action of acetylcholine by binding to and activating cholinergic receptors.



Definition:
Endocrine cell of the anterior pituitary gland responsible for synthesizing and releasing adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH).



Definition:
Endocrine cells are responsible for producing and releasing hormone molecules into the bloodstream. Endocrine cells are typically grouped together in organs referred to as endocrine glands.

Related glossary terms/phrases:
Endocrine gland
Hormone



Definition:
Excretion refers to the elimination of waste substances from the body. The kidneys and lungs are mainly responsible for excreting metabolites and waste products.

See also:
Secretion



Definition:
Protrusion or bulging of one or both eyeballs out of the orbit. It may be caused by swelling of orbital tissue in response to trauma, or by hyperthyroidism (especially primary hyperthyroidism).

It is also referred to as exophthalmus, exophthalmia, proptosis, or exorbitism.

Other resources:
Exophthalmos (Wikipedia)



Definition:
Endocrine cell of the anterior pituitary gland responsible for synthesizing and releasing follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH).



Definition:
The Hodgkin cycle represents a positive feedback loop in neurons, where an initial membrane depolarization from the resting value (∼ −70 mV) to the threshold value (∼ −50 mV) leads to rapid depolarization of the membrane potential to approach the equilibrium potential for Na+ (VNa ≈ +60 mV). The voltage-gated Na+ channels of neurons are responsible for the Hodgkin cycle.

See the figure depicting the Hodgkin cycle.

See also:
Important Features of the Neuronal Action Potential



Definition:
Endocrine cell of the anterior pituitary gland responsible for synthesizing and releasing prolactin (PRL).



Definition:
The voltage difference across a cell plasma membrane.

The membrane potential is generally inside negative with respect to the outside, where the outside potential is generally set as the reference value. In electrically excitable cells, the value of the membrane potential can be positive (inside with respect to the outside) during electrical activity (i.e., during action potentials).

Related glossary terms/phrases:
Resting membrane potential

See also:
Resting membrane potential



Definition:
An equation used to calculate the equilibrium potential (Veq.) of an ion. The equilibrium potential for an ion is also referred to as the Nernst potential for that ion. It is the membrane potential at which no net movement of the ion in question occurs across the membrane.

General form of the Nernst equation

where Veq. is the equilibrium potential, R is the universal gas constant, T is the temperature in Kelvin, z is the valence of the ionic species, F is the Faraday's constant, and [X]o and [X]i are the extracellular and intracellular, respectively, concentrations of the ion in question.

See also:
Resting Membrane Potential - Nernst Equilibrium Potential
Derivation of the Nernst Equation



Abbreviation:
OAEs

Definition:
Otoacoustic emissions (OAE) are sounds that arise from the organ of Corti within the cochlea of the inner ear in response to sound stimulation. They are thought to result from vibrations of cochlear outer hair cells (OHC) in response to stimulation by sound. Otoacoustic emissions are inaudible to the human ear, but can be recorded by placing a small recording device in the external auditory meatus (ear canal).

Otoacoustic emissions have clinical diagnostic value and are measured as part of hearing exams. In the newborn, otoacoustic emissions are recorded in order to detect blockage in the middle ear cavity (e.g., as a result of fluid accumulation) or external ear canal.



Definition:
Refers to that part of the action potential where the membrane potential is positive (inside with respect to the outside).

See figure.

See also:
Neuronal Action Potential - Important Features of the Neuronal Action Potential



Definition:
The component of the electrocardiogram (ECG) that corresponds to the depolarization of atrial myocytes. Atrial depolarization precedes atrial contraction.

Related glossary terms/phrases:
QRS complex
T wave



Definition:
Cells within the thyroid gland. Parafollicular cells are situated outside of the thyroid follicles and are interspersed between the follicles. Parafollicular cells are responsible for producing the hormone calcitonin. Parafollicular cells are also referred to as C cells.



Definition:
The component of the electrocardiogram (ECG) that corresponds to the depolarization of ventricular myocytes. Ventricular depolarization precedes ventricular contraction.

Related glossary terms/phrases:
P wave
T wave



Definition:
Endocrine cell of the anterior pituitary gland responsible for synthesizing and releasing growth hormone (GH).



Definition:
Refers to the rapid depolarization of the membrane early in the action potential. In neuronal, skeletal muscle, and cardiac muscle action potentials, the Hodgkin cycle is responsible for the spike phase of the action potential.

See figure.

See also:
Important Features of the Neuronal Action Potential



Definition:
A rectangular signal waveform used in physiological studies to perturb (i.e., challenge) the system under study. The response of the system to the pulse is then studied carefully to learn about how the system responds to challenges.

Examples include pulses of voltage or current in electrophysiological experiments. Other examples include pulses of light, pressure, temperature, ligand, etc.

A square-wave pulse is defined by the amplitude and duration of the pulse, as well as by the frequency at which the pulse is applied to the system under study.

See also:
Neuronal Action Potential - Introduction

Other resources:
Square wave (Wikipedia)



Definition:
The component of the electrocardiogram (ECG) that corresponds to the repolarization of the ventricles. Therefore, the T wave also corresponds to relaxation of the ventricles.

Related glossary terms/phrases:
P wave
QRS complex



Definition:
Tachyphylaxis describes a condition where a person (or animal subject) develops rapid tolerance to a drug following a single or repeated administration of the drug. Therefore, higher doses of the drug may be needed to achieve the same response.



Definition:
Endocrine cell of the anterior pituitary gland responsible for synthesizing and releasing thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH).









Posted: Sunday, March 31, 2013
Last updated: Friday, August 28, 2015