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Glossary of Physiology Terms
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There are 16 glossary search results for:   Kn E




Definition:
The one-way valve between the left atrium and left ventricle of the heart. It is also known as the left atrioventricular valve or mitral valve.

The direction of blood flow through the bicuspid valve is from the left atrium to the left ventricle.

Related glossary terms/phrases:
Left atrioventricular valve
Mitral valve



Definition:
A potent blocker of nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, nAChR) found at the neuromuscular junction. At small doses, curare can lead to muscle weakness. At high doses, curare can lead to paralysis of skeletal muscles, which would also result in asphyxiation (and ultimately death) due to paralysis of the diaphragm. Curare was commonly the active agent of poison arrow.

Other resources:
See Wikipedia



Definition:
The enzyme found in target tissues of the thyroid hormones that converts thyroxine (also known as tetraiodothyronine or T4) to triiodothyronine (T3).

Specifically, 5'-deiodinase converts T4 to the active form of the thyroid hormone, T3.

5-Deiodinase converts T4 to the inactive form of the thyroid hormone, reverse T3 (rT3).



Definition:
A type of primary hypothyroidism, Hashimoto's disease is an autoimmune disorder, in which anti-thyroid antibodies destroy the ability of the thyroid gland to produce the thyroid hormones. Antibodies against thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and thyroglobulin (Tg) are often seen in this disorder.

Hashimoto's disease is also known as Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

Related glossary terms/phrases:
Hypothyroidism
Primary hypothyroidism



Definition:
The one-way valve between the left atrium and left ventricle of the heart. It is also known as the bicuspid valve or mitral valve.

The direction of blood flow through the left atrioventricular valve is from the left atrium to the left ventricle.

Related glossary terms/phrases:
Bicuspid valve
Mitral valve



Definition:
The one-way valve between the left atrium and left ventricle of the heart. It is also known as the left atrioventricular valve or bicuspid valve.

The direction of blood flow through the mitral valve is from the left atrium to the left ventricle.

Related glossary terms/phrases:
Left atrioventricular valve
Bicuspid valve



Definition:
Neurohormones are chemical messenger molecules that are released by neurons, but enter the bloodstream where they travel to distant target sites within the body. Therefore, neurohormones share characteristics with both neurotransmitters and hormones. Similar to neurotransmitters, neurohormones are released by neurons. Similar to hormones, neurohormones travel in the bloodstream.

Two well-known examples of neurohormones are oxytocin and the antidiuretic hormone (also referred to as vasopressin).

Related glossary terms/phrases:
Hormone
Neurotransmitter



Definition:
Surgical removal of one or both ovaries.

Also known as ovariectomy

See:
Ovariectomy



Definition:
Surgical removal of one or both ovaries.

Also known as oophorectomy

Related glossary terms/phrases:
Oophorectomy



Definition:
Cells in the fundus of the stomach that secrete hydrochloric acid and intrinsic factor.

Parietal cells are also known as oxyntic cells.



Definition:
The one-way valve between the right atrium and right ventricle of the heart. It is also known as the tricuspid valve.

The direction of blood flow through the right atrioventricular valve is from the right atrium to the right ventricle.

Related glossary terms/phrases:
Tricuspid valve



Definition:
Secondary active transport is a type of active transport across a biological membrane in which a transport protein couples the movement of an ion (typically Na+ or H+) down its electrochemical gradient to the movement of another ion or molecule against a concentration or electrochemical gradient. The ion moving down its electrochemical gradient is referred to as the driving ion. The ion/molecule being transported against a chemical or electrochemical gradient is referred to as the driven ion/molecule.

This transport process is referred to as active transport because the driven ion/molecule is transported against a concentration or electrochemical gradient. It is referred to as secondary active transport because no ATP hydrolysis is involved in this process (as opposed to primary active transport). The energy required to drive transport resides in the transmembrane electrochemical gradient of the driving ion.

Secondary active transport is also referred to as ion-coupled transport. Those utilizing Na+ as the driving ion are called Na+-coupled transporters. Those utilizing H+ as the driving ion are called H+-coupled transporters.

Two types of secondary active transport exist: cotransport (also known as symport) and exchange (also known as antiport). Na+/glucose cotransporter and H+/dipeptide cotransporter are examples of cotransporters. Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and Na+/H+ exchanger are examples of exchangers.

Related glossary terms/phrases:
Cotransport
Symport
Exchange
Antiport

See also:
Lecture notes on Secondary Active Transport



Definition:
The one-way valve between the right atrium and right ventricle of the heart. It is also known as the right atrioventricular valve.

The direction of blood flow through the tricuspid valve is from the right atrium to the right ventricle.

Related glossary terms/phrases:
Tricuspid valve



Definition:
All-or-nothing is usually used when describing the action potential. It refers to the well-known observation that an action potential always occurs in its full size (i.e., full magnitude of voltage change).

Many physiologists use all-or-nothing and all-or-none interchangeably.

See also:
Important Features of the Neuronal Action Potential



Definition:
A glycoprotein released by parietal cells (also know as oxyntic cells) located in the fundus region of the stomach. Intrinsic factor is required for vitamin B12 absorption in the small intestine.



Definition:
Peptide hormone produced by the anterior pituitary gland. Prolactin is best known for its action in stimulating the mammary glands to produce milk (lactation).

Prolactin is known to be involved in many other physiological processes including enlargement of the mammary glands in preparation for milk production, sexual gratification, metabolism, regulation of the immune system, and others.

Other resources:
Prolactin (Wikipedia)









Posted: Sunday, March 31, 2013
Last updated: Friday, August 28, 2015