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There are 9 glossary search results for:   pore




Definition:
Proposed model for the inactivation of some voltage-gated ion channels. According to this model, after channel opening, the pore of the open channel is plugged by a globular cytoplasmic portion of the channel protein. The globular portion (ball of amino acids) is tethered to the rest of the protein by a linker part (chain of amino acids).

Related glossary terms/phrases:
Channel inactivation

See also:
Neuronal Action Potential - Important Features of the Neuronal Action Potential



Definition:
Refers to a conformational change of a channel protein by which the channel goes from the open state to the inactive state. The inactive state refers to a conformational state in which ions are not allowed to permeate the channel pore. Thus, with respect to ion permeability, the inactive state is similar to the close state of the channel. Ions cannot permeate the channel pore either in the closed or inactive state. However, the channel assumes very distinct and different conformations in the inactive state and closed state.

See also:
Neuronal Action Potential - Important Features of the Neuronal Action Potential



Definition:
An integral membrane protein which contains a pore through which ions, water, or polar molecules permeate. For any given channel, the pore is usually very selective for the particular ion or molecule. For example, sodium (Na+) channels are very selective for Na+ over other cations.

The channel pore may be constitutively open, or it may be gated to the open state by various stimuli such as chemical ligands, voltage, temperature, or mechanical stimulation of the membrane.



Definition:
Electrophysiology is the study of the electrical properties of biological macromolecules, cells, tissues, and organs. Electrical signals such as voltage and/or current are generally measured. Examples include measuring changes in the membrane voltage of excitable cells (e.g., neurons, muscle cells, and some endocrine cells) during an action potential. The current carrried by ions as they permeate the pore of ion channels can also be measured - both at the single-channel level (single-channel current), as well as the macroscopic current resulting from the activity of a population of channels. As another example, electrical measurements may involve recording voltage changes at the surface of the skin that result from the activity of skeletal muscles (electromyogram, EMG), cardiac myocytes (electrocardiogram, ECG), or neurons in the brain (electroencephalogram, EEG).



Definition:
Not permeable. Not allowing the passage of substances. Impermeable refers to a property of a membrane or channel pore in preventing or restricting the passage of substances. For example, the lipid bilayer portion of biological membranes is highly impermeable to ions and large polar molecules.

See also permeable.

Related glossary terms/phrases:
Permeable
Permeability
Permeant
Impermeant

See also:
Lipid Bilayer Permeability



Definition:
Not permeant. Incapable of passing through or penetrating. Impermeant refers to the inability of a substance (e.g., ion or molecule) to cross (i.e., permeate or penetrate) a biological membrane or channel pore. For example, it can be said that ions are membrane impermeant.

See also permeant.

Related glossary terms/phrases:
Permeant
Permeability
Permeable
Impermeable

See also:
Lipid Bilayer Permeability



Definition:
Permeability refers to the ease with which molecules cross biological membranes. It may also refer to the ease with which ions or molecules pass through the pore of channel proteins.

Related glossary terms/phrases:
Permeable
Impermeable
Permeant
Impermeant

See also:
Lipid Bilayer Permeability



Definition:
Permeable refers to a property of a membrane or channel pore in allowing substances to pass through. For example, the lipid bilayer portion of biological membranes is highly permeable to fat-soluble molecules, but is not permeable to ions and large polar molecules.

See also impermeable.

Related glossary terms/phrases:
Impermeable
Permeability
Permeant
Impermeant

See also:
Lipid Bilayer Permeability



Definition:
Permeant refers to the ability of a substance (e.g., ion or molecule) to cross (i.e., permeate or penetrate) a biological membrane or channel pore. For example, it can be said that fat-soluble molecules are membrane permeant.

See also impermeant.

Related glossary terms/phrases:
Impermeant
Permeability
Permeable
Impermeable

See also:
Lipid Bilayer Permeability









Posted: Sunday, March 31, 2013
Last updated: Friday, August 28, 2015