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Physiology Chart
Relative sizes of body fluid compartments.
Relative sizes of body fluid compartments. Click for higher resolution image.
Relative sizes of body fluid compartments.
As shown in other figures for men and women, body fluids are located in two main compartments: intracellular fluid (ICF) compartment and extracellular fluid (ECF) compartment. The intracellular fluid compartment contains the fluid that is present in the cytoplasm of all cells of the body. This compartment holds approximately 67% of the total volume of body fluids. The extracellular fluid compartment makes up approximately 33% of the total volume of body fluids. This compartment can be further subdivided into the interstitial fluid (~25% of total body fluid volume), plasma (~7% of total body fluid volume), and transcellular fluid (~1% of total body fluid volume). Interstitial fluid is the fluid that directly bathes the cells and tissues in the body. Transcellular fluid is found in small amounts in specialized compartments (e.g., cerebrospinal fluid, intraocular fluids, inner ear fluids, pericardial fluid, peritoneal fluid, synovial fluids, etc.). All percentages shown in this figure refer to the percentage of the total body fluid volume in an adult human being. In adult men, the total fluid volume is approximately 60% of the total body weight. In adult women, the total fluid volume is approximately 55% of the total body weight. Note that this figure only demonstrates the relative sizes of body fluid compartments and does not provide any information regarding how these compartments are related to one another. The relationship between the intracellular fluid compartment, interstitial fluid, and plasma can be seen in this figure.






Posted: Wednesday, November 25, 2015